Arts & Leisure

07/02/2020
Editor’s note: This is part of a series of stories and photos by Neshobe Elementary School students in reaction to their spring spent distance learning. Sigourney Brodowski — Age 7 This picture shows me and a mural on the wall of our porch. I designed it and I am painting the mural right now. I work on it once a day during a time that I would normally be at school with Ms. Leary. It’s important to me because when I look at the mural it kind of reminds me of school. In the mural there is a school (not painted yet), a bear, a school bus and a girl. Staying home has been nice because we have...
07/02/2020
Editor’s note: This is part of a series of stories and photos by Neshobe Elementary School students in reaction to their spring spent distance learning. Odin Waldie (Braeden’s little brother) I am 7 years old and I have gone to Leicester School for three years. Every Memorial Day our whole school walks down the road to the cemetery. We each carry a flag to wave on the way and most of us bring lilacs to leave on the graves there. We always sing songs and read poems or things we have written. The fourth-graders place a wreath to honor the veterans who have died. Then a bugle plays and we...
07/02/2020
Editor’s note: This is part of a series of stories and photos by Neshobe Elementary School students in reaction to their spring spent distance learning. Silas Waldie (Braeden’s other little brother) I just turned 6 and finished kindergarten at home because of the bad virus. Online classes were scary. Everybody’s pictures were on the screen looking at me. Mostly I stood across the room looking out the window and listened to my friends talking. After a few times I answered my teacher’s questions with the camera off, so no one could see me. At school I liked sitting on the rug. I could talk to...
07/02/2020
(Tor Teen) To amplify Black voices, it is important to read beyond the (still very important) contextual Black history and anti-racism books; it is important to read great stories that are written by Black authors with captivating Black characters, like this one. The secretly magical teens at the heart of this story engage with and comment on some of the same social issues we are grappling with today: racism, prejudice and oppression. In Tavia and Effie’s world, not all teens are treated equally. Sirens are forced to hide themselves, or wear silencing collars, to avoid persecution. Tavia, a...

JAPANESE BARBERRY, A popular landscaping plant, is a haven for ticks and should be replaced. Courtesy photo
07/02/2020
The Rutland Chapter of UVM Extension Master Gardeners has some concerns about a common ornamental plant that you may have on your property. The Japanese barberry is a spiny shrub that in the past 30 years became a popular landscape plant, chosen for its red autumn foliage and red berries in winter, and because it is deer resistant. The plant has virtually no predators or natural deterrents, and its thorns put off most animals that might graze on it. Why is Japanese barberry a problem?  Japanese barberry is originally from Asia, and consequently does not have natural enemies or competition in...

HISTORIC FORT TICONDEROGA, a British stronghold captured by the Green Mountain Boys in the American Revolution, sits on 2,000 acres in New York across Lake Champlain from Addison County, Vermont. It opened for visitors this week. Photo credit Carl Heilman II, © Fort Ticonderoga
07/02/2020
Historic Fort Ticonderoga, located in New York state just across Lake Champlain from Shoreham, Vt., this week opened for the season. The historic site, museum and family destination is hailed by many as the premier living history program in North America. Fort Ticonderoga’s museum staff brings history to life every day. Ticonderoga’s epic history and signature stories are highlighted through innovative story telling on a grand scale through portrayal of historic crafts and trades, daily soldiers’ life programs, weapons demonstrations, endless outdoor activities, and captivating special events...
07/02/2020
Vermont Humanities and the Vermont Arts Council have distributed $517,500 in emergency relief grants to 81 different Vermont cultural organizations, including museums, libraries, performing arts venues, and other cultural centers. Many of these organizations are right here in Addison County or serve local residents. The grants support humanities and arts organizations that have been impacted by the COVID-19 outbreak and the resulting economic downturn. With events, festivals, camps and summer seasons canceled, cultural organizations across Vermont are struggling to survive. Arts and cultural...
07/02/2020
Fireworks, barbecues and heat can be a dangerous trio for pets. As the state begins to ease COVID-19 restrictions, friends and family will begin to gather again and with the Fourth of July rapidly approaching, barbecues and fireworks may be on the agenda. While most people love the festivities, fireworks, barbeques and heat of day can all pose issues for dogs, cats, horses and even livestock, which can react to fireworks in ways that could potentially cause injury and sometimes death. Some simple precautions at these gatherings can help keep your animals safe. Whether you’re attending a...
07/02/2020
The real estate market in northwest Vermont is recovering after the necessary shut down due to COVID-19, according to a report based on New England Real Estate Network numbers. The stay-at-home order went into effect on March 25 with restricted showings beginning again in late April. New listings in April declined 45% and pending contracts declined nearly 50%, according to a press release from Coldwell Banker Hickok & Boardman. As a result, a steep decline in closed sales followed in May. Real estate transactions typically take 45-60 days to close — therefore the restricted activity in...

COMEDIAN AND PEIRCING artist Pierre Vachon playfully pours hand sanitizer on his head while showing off his tattoos for his upcoming COVID Calendar. The Middlebury entertainer is finding new creative outlets since public gatherings went away when COVID-19 showed up. Photo by Season Violet
06/25/2020
MIDDLEBURY — Over the years, modern day Renaissance man Pierre Vachon has worn many different hats. The Burlington native has been known as a professional wrestler, a stand-up comedian, a piercing artist, an event producer at the Marquis Theater in Middlebury, and a DJ with Big Guys Entertainment, which he started with his friend Vinny Herbert. But, when most in-person entertainment was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Vachon found himself scrambling for a place to exercise his imagination … and to earn a paycheck. Well, the Middlebury resident is doing what he does best: getting...

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Addison County Independent

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Middlebury, VT 05753

Phone: 802.388.4944
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