Arts & Leisure

Steve Gross is the Middlebury Classic Film Club Convener. Maybe it’s because we live in Middlebury, but the first thing that hit me when I thought about this film series was Robert Frost’s poem “Mending Wall.” Frost’s neighbor insists, “Good fences make good neighbors.” Yet this seems hardly self evident to Frost who asks, “Why do they make good neighbors? Isn’t it where there are cows? But here there are no cows.” He wonders whom he is walling out and whom he is walling in. He further asks who he might be offending by building a wall in the first place. Speaking about walls in our current...

Photo by Paul Dahm
Tiny books fit well into the hands of small children, they are easy to carry in your pocket (or even around your neck), and they feel special by virtue of their size. Depending on who you ask, not everyone agrees on which books qualify as “miniature.” While many serious collectors maintain a strict 7.6 cm height rule, the curators at Middlebury College’s Davis Library (and the Library of Congress) consider all books 10 cm in height or less to be miniature books.  To show off some of these magnificent minis, Kaitlin Buerge (2013 Middlebury College grad) and director and curator of Special...

EUAN BEAR WAS the editor of “Out in the Mountains” from 2002 to 2006. She was born in New Hampshire and graduated from Colby College in Waterville, Maine, where she co-founded (in 1974) Maine’s second gay and lesbian student organization. Euan moved to Vermont in 1977. She was a member of the editorial committee of CommonWomon and wrote and edited for the Vermont Vanguard Press. She is an activist for all women, lesbians, gay men, bisexual and transgender persons, plus queer and questioning and nonbinary people. This portrait is part of the Vermont Folklife Center’s current exhibit “Pride 1983,” now on view in the Middlebury gallery and online. Photo courtesy of Vermont Folklife Center
The Vermont Folklife Center on Main Street in Middlebury reopened on Sep. 8 for in-person visitors. Come and see the current exhibit “Pride 1983” that explores the origins and lasting legacy of Burlington’s first LGBTQ2+ Pride celebration on June 25, 1983. Curated by Meg Tamulonis of the Vermont Queer Archives — a program of the Pride Center of Vermont — “Pride 1983” draws on archival materials from that collection as well as from UVM Special Collections, the Out in the Open Andrews Inn Oral History Project, and the personal collections of those featured in the exhibition. In addition,...

THIS YEAR'S TOUR de Farms will be hosted on Saturday, Sept. 18, when 400 riders will peddle through Charlotte, Ferrisburgh and Vergennes sampling food and beverages at the eight designated stops.
ACORN’s 13th annual Tour de Farms, one of Vermont’s oldest cycling farm tours, is returning after 2020’s COVID-induced hiatus. On Saturday, Sept. 18, riders will make eight stops along a 30-mile route and sample some of the Champlain Valley’s best food and beverages. While the route and several of the stops are similar to previous years’, ride organizers have introduced many new vendors that will create a different experience for 2021’s participants. There will be new products to taste and enjoy, and as in past years, riders can make as many purchases as they’d like and won’t have to carry...

THE KOWAL FAMILY Band, featuring Maddie (13/fiddle), Finn (16/banjo), Ted (11/mandolin) and Max (17/guitar), will play at the Rokeby Museum’s Harvest Day on Sept. 19, from 12-3 p.m.
On Sept. 19, from 12-3 p.m., Rokeby Museum is hosting a family-friendly, autumnal celebration outside on the Rokeby lawns. The afternoon will be filled with kids activities, including crafts, games, story time and music. Author Eugenie Doyle, will hold a read-along of her book, “Sleep Tight Farm,” at 12:30 p.m. Afterward, Rokeby staff will lead a historic tool talk and demonstration, sharing stories about family, food, farming and changes through time. Children are invited to paint harvest murals and participate in leaf collecting crafts and games. Free apples are provided by Champlain...

JEFF REHBACH WILL pass his baton as director of the Middlebury College Community Chorus to Jeff Buettner, director of choral activities at Middlebury College.
“Music has always been a part of my life.” Since he was a boy growing up in a suburb of Rochester, N.Y., Jeff Rehbach was surrounded and inspired by music. “My parents sang in the Lutheran church choir in my hometown, and my younger sister, brother and I all sang in the youth choir at the church,” he described in a recent interview. “Our aunts, uncles and first cousins gathered at Christmastime to sing carols together each year from the time we were all in elementary school right through high school and early college years.” He picked up the violin in fourth grade and continued with that...

HARRY LANDON AND a young Joan Crawford star in “Tramp Tramp Tramp” (1926), a vintage silent comedy to be screened with live music on Saturday, Sept. 18, at 7 p.m., at Brandon Town Hall, 1 Conant Square. Admission is free, with donations accepted.
Relive the golden age of screen comedy with a silent film program, complete with live music, on Saturday, Sept. 18, at 7 p.m., at the Brandon Town Hall and Community Center. The evening’s featured attraction is “Tramp Tramp Tramp” (1926), a full-length comedy starring Harry Langdon and written by a very young Frank Capra, who would later direct the classic Christmas film “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Joan Crawford, at the very beginning of her career, co-stars with Langdon, a comedian whose popularity rivaled that of Charlie Chaplin for a brief period in the 1920s. Admission is free; donations are...
(W. W. Norton & Company) In Joy Harjo’s second memoir, the poet, author, musician, playwright, and first Native American to serve as the U.S. poet laureate, reveals, in illuminating detail, the many and varied influences and confluences that came to guide or propel Harjo into manifesting her dream of communicating through her words. She tells of family members, ancestors, members of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, recalls the stories passed down from one generation to the next, objects heavy with significance and use similarly passed down, and how they shaped and defined her world. In...

'OUTSIDE IN,' A painting by Lori Mehta
Edgewater Galleries in Middlebury have new exhibits featured for the month of September. Kimberlee Alemian and Lori Mehta are the featured artists in “Still Life/Life Stills,” a two-person show at Edgewater Gallery on the Green, 6 Merchant’s Row. Alemian focuses on the fleeting effect of light on her still life objects and Mehta paints figures discovered in moments that  reveal the beauty of a small gesture. At Edgewater Gallery at the Falls, One Mill Street, “Locally Grown” opens featuring Woody Jackson, Sara Katz and Sage Tucker-Ketcham. This group exhibition will be on view through Oct. 31...
The Vermont Folklife Center proudly announces publication of “Turner Family Stories: From Enslavement in Virginia to Freedom in Vermont,” a new non-fiction comics anthology adapted from oral history recordings with Daisy Turner of Grafton, Vt., held in the Vermont Folklife Center Archive. Daisy Turner, born in Grafton in 1883, was the daughter of formerly enslaved Alec and Sally Turner, who settled there in the years following the Civil War. In 1983 VFC founder Jane Beck met then 100-year-old Daisy and worked with her to record approximately 60 hours of interviews through which Daisy...

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