Arts & Leisure


'MARY'S GOLDEN DREAM,' a work by Homer G. Wells
MIDDLEBURY — “Shedding Light,” featuring new collections from painter Kay Flierl and etched aluminum artist Homer G. Wells. As the seasons shift, the changes in light and the tones of the landscape are reflected and interpreted by both artists. On view April 1-May 31 at Edgewater Gallery at the Falls, One Mill Street in Middlebury.  “All Around Us,” a solo exhibition of new work by Charlie Bluett. Bluett’s large-scale, abstract paintings are cascading overlapping forms that shift in different planes and reference seaglass and the subtle ebb and flow of the natural world’s processes. On view...

Photo courtesy of Caspian Oyster Depot
Hopefully you’ve had the pleasure of ordering and enjoying the fresh fish that’s being delivered to Bristol’s Main Street every week. Wait, what? Fresh fish in our beloved, alas land-locked, Vermont? Yes. But there’s a catch. Justin and Sophie Wright — the married duo who opened Caspian Oyster Depot as a pop-up fish and local provisions market at Tandem in late December — are going to pause their business on April 16. Why? Well, first, the couple is expecting the arrival of their baby in early May, and second, Tandem needs the space back for their busy summer season. “It’s been a lot of fun...
Dog bites post a serious health risk to people, communities, and society as a whole. According to the Center for Disease Control, more than 800,000 people receive medical care for dog bites and over 4.5 million people are bitten by dogs each year. Further, over half of those bitten are children. In Vermont, 550 children were treated at the hospital for dog bite wounds between 2012-2016. That number doesn’t include children who were bitten for whom medical help was not sought or needed, or where actual contact didn’t occur, but unsafe interactions happened. National Dog Bite Prevention Week is...

YOUNG TRADITION VERMONT typically travels the world each spring to showcase nine months worth of learning. This year the 20-member teen Touring Group has been prerecording and producing a series of videos to share with master artists and other youth organizations in Ireland, Cape Breton, Quebec, England, New Brunswick and beyond. The tour will start on Town Hall Theater’s YouTube and Facebook Live platforms on Saturday, April 3, at 7 p.m. Links to the premiere are at townhalltheater.org.
Around here, if you’re a teen interested in traditional music and dance chances are you are well aware of Young Tradition Vermont. Participants in YTV programs learn from and are supported by artist leaders, visiting and guest master musicians and dancers/dance leaders, in addition to musical exchanges with master artists, young musicians and dancers while on performance tours. Coming up on Saturday, April 3, at 7 p.m., the Young Tradition Touring Group will perform a 45-60 minute online concert via Town Hall Theater’s YouTube and Facebook Live platforms. Featured will be the 20 teen members...

SOPHONISBA BRECKINRIDGE, INK sketch, c. 1900, Collection of Henry Sheldon Museum
From the Sheldon Museum Archives: Last year we published several articles about remarkable local women in recognition of the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, which granted most American women the right to vote. In this two-part series, we focus on two amazing women who challenged the status quo of late nineteenth-century life. Their stories offer just a glimpse of what is hidden in our archives.  This past summer, archivist Eva Garcelon-Hart and I discovered two portrait drawings in the Sheldon archives. Inscriptions reveal the pair to be “Miss Nisba...

NATE GUSAKOV
Bleep! Technical difficulties.  We’ve all been there.  Last Friday, Nate Gusakov had to pull the plug on his own show, which kicked off the new music series out of Burnham Hall in Lincoln.  “It all fell apart,” Gusakov said in a phone call this week. “We tested our internet connection and it was great, then we got there and it went out. So we used our backup plan and that went out too.” Just a half an hour before the show, Gusakov decided to start recording for a last ditch effort, but called it quits about half-way through his show.  “It had been such a frazzle of a day,” he said. “So we...
(Forever) If you like cooking competitions and romantic comedy, you will love Farah Heron’s new romance. Reena Manji’s parents have done it again; they’ve arranged her marriage to her father’s newest hire, a “Good Muslim,” but the Nadim who moves in across the hall from Reena is rakishly good-looking, enjoys craft beer (taboo), reveals an impossibly cute dimple when he smiles, and Reena is instantly smitten, that is, until she discovers that Nadim is her future husband. Vowing never to wed, the two enter a cooking show competition (rules require two contestants who are “in a relationship”)...

TRICIA KNOLL
The Usefulness of an Umbrella Few care about this ordinariness that spends summer days in the back of closets until a chiller wind whips in squalls and out of nowhere you are on a city street with the only person you can imagine sharing with, an uneven compromise of broad shoulders and slim expectations or steps bumbled in fear of falling and his hand is so much bigger than yours. If this were a seesaw, you’d wonder if it is play, a tug and release, let me take care of you instead of taking care of myself so wholeheartedly that I let go or diminish myself so our ceiling is higher and broader...
Battery Dance Festival (New York City’s longest-running, free, public dance festival) presents a free virtual program celebrating the work of Canadian dance makers — Citadel + Compagnie, Kaeja d’Dance, RUBBERBAND, The National Ballet of Canada, and Tanveer Alam — in partnership with the Consulate General of Canada in New York. A link to the 7 p.m. broadcast will be posted at batterydance.org on Thursday, March 26. The video of “Canadian Voices in Dance” will be available to watch for 30 days after the premiere and will expire on April 22.  Here’s the line up of performances: Citadel +...

ILLUSTRATION BY ADELAIDE Murphy Tyrol
On Valentine’s Day, as I sat down to write, I noticed a burst of blue outside my upstairs window. Looking out with my binoculars, I counted six eastern bluebirds. Clustered on and below my suet feeders, they were a wonderfully pleasant surprise on a chilly February morning. As I watched, the bluebirds briefly fed on the suet before finding perches in a red maple above the feeders. Within a few moments, they were gone entirely, an ephemeral splash of color amidst a snow-covered Maine lawn. With their vibrant colors, bluebirds are easy to identify. Males sport a rich blue head and back with a...

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Addison County Independent