Arts & Leisure


'PORTRAIT OF A Girl,' 1862, sculpted white marble portrait relief roundel, diameter: 18 1/2 inches; depth: 2 inches. Collection of Middlebury College Museum of Art, purchase with funds provided by the Reva B. Seybolt ’72 Art Acquisition Fund and the Electra Havemeyer Webb Memorial Fund, 2019.
MIDDLEBURY — In the past year the Middlebury College Art Museum was able to acquire a stunning neoclassical marble portrait tondo carved in 1862 in Rome. What is particularly notable about the relief is that it is among the first identified sculptures of its kind by a Vermont-born woman artist. The relief, signed and dated “M. F. Foley. SC. Roma. 1862,” is by Margaret F. Foley (1827–1877) who grew up in Vergennes. While stories abound of artists overcoming challenging odds to establish themselves and make a living from their work, it was many times more difficult for American women than men...

'SATURDAY,' BY HANNAH Morris, is one of the pieces on display at Northern Daughter’s Gallery in Vergennes.
Northern Daughters Gallery presents “Winter White” this holiday season. The exhibit features the work of artists Julia Jensen, Matthew Monk, Hannah Morris, Erika Lawlor Schmidt, Hannah Sessions, Pamela Smith, and Susanne Strater and will be exhibited through Jan. 15 at Northern Daughters Gallery in Vergennes, and Jan. 16 to Feb. 28 at the Annex Gallery at Village Wine and Coffee in Shelburne. “As curators we approached this exhibit from an aesthetic standpoint, with the muted colors of winter putting emphasis on composition and texture of work,” noted Sophie Pickens and Justine Jackson. “And...

THE NORFOLK ISLAND pine, a popular holiday gift, makes a great potted plant that will thrive indoors for many years with proper care. Photo / Blumz by JRDesigns, metro Detroit
This holiday season Christmas trees laden with cherished ornaments and twinkly lights evoking a sense of wonder, peace and warmth will adorn our homes. When the festivities conclude, this cozy haven disappears as we relinquish our trees to the trash. For many, this sharp change in scenery, the deep cold and the darkness combine to invite the winter woes. How can we keep the holiday cheer going to avoid the bleakness of winter? An answer may lie with the Norfolk Island pine (Araucaria heterophylla). Often referred to as the “living Christmas tree,” it will continue to grace a home long past...

AN ATLANTIC PUFFIN returns to Eastern Egg Rock with lunch for its chicks at a previous Hog Island Audubon Camp. Photo by Ryley Olsen
Otter Creek Audubon Society (OCAS) will provide an $800 scholarship to help an Addison County educator or teen attend the renowned Hog Island Audubon Camp next summer. Located off the scenic coast of Maine, the camp is run by the National Audubon Society and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Every summer they offer sessions, each lasting about five days. Every summer, that is, until this past summer, when camp was canceled due to COVID-19.  The summer of 2021 still poses uncertainties and registration for next summer’s tentative session has been postponed to an unspecified date in early 2021....
(Sounds True) You’ve probably heard of the Dutch extreme athlete Wim Hof, also known as the Iceman, who has set numerous world records with his ability to withstand freezing temperatures. In his newest book, following his nonfiction works “The Way of the Iceman” and “Becoming the Iceman,” Hof instructs the average person on how to activate their full human potential in a straightforward and uniquely Iceman fashion. He starts by describing his youth, the adversities he faced, and how his innate curiosity once compelled him to “undress myself and just go naked into the cold water” and begin “...

LOCAL ARTIST DOUG Lazarus completed his most recent project “Middlebury’s Own,” which celebrates seven remarkable individuals, and installed the 4- by 6-foot banners in the new park in front of Twilight Hall in mid-November. The exhibit will be on view through December. Independent photo/Steve James
These days it’s all too easy to get a little depressed when you think about the trajectory of the pandemic. We’re missing friends and family. We’re yearning to get out of the house and mingle, to be free of restrictions, to enjoy the theater and the arts.  We’re all going through a lot of pressure. It’s enough to make you wish some hero or heroine would take center stage and give us some reprieve. Doug Lazarus, a longtime Middlebury resident and artist who recently relocated to Forest Dale, may not be a knight on a white horse, but he has put up a portrait installation in downtown Middlebury...

A SCENE FROM "Coded Bias."
Shalini Kantayya’s newest film, “Coded Bias,” will screen for free across Vermont in a virtual format from Dec. 7-13. Modern society sits at the intersection of two crucial questions: What does it mean when artificial intelligence (AI) increasingly governs our liberties? And what are the consequences for the people AI is biased against? “Coded Bias” follows MIT Media Lab researcher Joy Buolamwini’s startling discovery that many facial recognition technologies fail more often on darker-skinned faces. Buolamwini delves into an investigation of widespread bias in artificial intelligence and the...
(Harper) On the surface, this small serious novel, droll in moments, concerns the individual experiences of three young people who, having been witness to and actors in a tragic occurrence, find themselves no longer comfortable in their ordinary lives as they existed up until this point. The three teenage siblings, Duncan, Zoe and Matthew, are each moved to venture further afield in their respective quests for self-discovery, as they examine and grapple with the larger questions of infidelity, violence and crime. Duncan resolves to look for his birth mother, Zoe embarks on a sexual awakening...

ILLUSTRATION BY ADELAIDE Murphy Tyrol
Rat-a-tat-tat. Showers of acorns hit the ground and tapped our heads as my husband and I hiked the Appalachian Trail. Thousands of acorns strewn across the path atop multi-colored leaves made for treacherous passage. We were hiking a portion of the trail through the Berkshires, and the tall, straight red oaks that grow in these hillside forests had produced a bumper crop of mast.  Oak trees have been around for millions of years, and there are numerous species growing throughout the world. In a Scientific American article published last summer, researchers reconstructed the “remarkable...

PEDIATRICIAN/POET JACK Mayer recently won the Proverse Prize 2019 for his new book of poems “Poems From the Wilderness.” Join him on a live Zoom reading and discussion on Thursday, Dec. 3 hosted by The Vermont Book Shop in Middlebury.
Living here in Addison County, it’s a fair guess that most of us like nature; many of us might even say we “love it.” Whatever it is, we’re all certainly thankful for it. And during this time of year, it seems fitting to recognize the things we cherish — even amid a pandemic. Local pediatrician and poet Jack Mayer has spent more than a moment contemplating his thanks for the natural world. In fact, his most recent book of poems, “Poems from the Wilderness,” is a collection about his “love of the backcountry, trail-walking, camping and the ‘wilderness effect’ — a unique sensation of aliveness...

Pages

Login for Subscriber Access

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

Addison County Independent