Arts & Leisure


A WORK BY Catherine Palmer
BRANDON — The Brandon Artists Guild (BAG) announces its “Pet Project” — an animal-themed exhibit that celebrates all creatures great and small. The exhibit runs from March 5 through May 2. There will be a free closing reception on Friday, April 23, from 5-7 p.m. The all-media, all-member show includes works in paint, fiber, glass, ceramics, collage, wood and more.  “We’re calling it ‘Pet Project’ because it’s truly a topic that’s near and dear to our hearts,” said dog lover and illustrator Ashley Wolff. “Plus, it’s about pets, of course. With so many people stuck at home these days, we’re...
(Atlantic Monthly Press) “Endpapers,” a historical and literary narrative/memoir, written by Cornwall-based journalist Alexander Wolff, opens with an illustrated family tree and contains a liberally-distributed trove of family and archival photographs, but that is just the beginning. In order to deeply investigate this story — of his exiled German grandfather, Kurt Wolff, an influential book publisher, and his father, Niko Wolff, a Wehrmacht soldier who emigrated to the United States — Wolff uprooted his family and moved them to Berlin for over a year to avail himself of all the research...

SMALL, WHITE COTTONY balls lined up along the twigs of the hemlock tree indicate the presence of the hemlock woolly adelgid. Photo: Connecticut Agricultural Experimental Station, Bugwood.org
As you hit the trails this winter, take a close look at Vermont’s forests. Some trees are threatened by invasive forest insects, and in some places, you might be the only one to spot them. The three pests to be on the lookout for when exploring our forests are the emerald ash borer, hemlock woolly adelgid and Asian longhorned beetle. If you see signs of any of these pests, take photos, snag the GPS location and submit your findings at vtinvasives.org using the Report It! link.  The emerald ash borer, an invasive beetle native to southeast Asia, was first confirmed in the United States in 2002...

JAZZ PIANIST SULLIVAN Fortner will perform a free virtual concert on Friday, March 12. This is the second concert in the Middlebury Performing Arts Series spring season.
Grammy Award-winning pianist Sullivan Fortner will perform a free virtual concert for the Middlebury Performing Arts Series spring season on Friday, March 12, at 7:30 p.m. Fortner has gained international praise as a pianist, composer and band leader, and for his collaborative work with artists such as Wynton Marsalis, Paul Simon, Diane Reeves, Etienne Charles, Cecile McLorin Salvant, John Scofield and more. In 2019, Fortner earned recognition in multiple DownBeat Critics Poll categories, winning first place in Rising Star Piano and Rising Star Jazz Artist.  This concert is free and open to...

JOHN SINGLETON COPLEY (1738-1815), Mrs. John Scollay (Mercy Greenleaf), 1763. Oil on canvas, 35 1/4 x 28 in. Collection of Shelburne Museum, purchased with funds from Judith and James Pizzagalli, Marna and Charles Davis, Christine and Robert Stiller, and Heidi Drymer and Peter Graham. Image courtesy Shelburne Museum
SHELBURNE — Shelburne Museum has acquired a portrait by John Singleton Copley entitled “Mrs. John Scollay (Mercy Greenleaf),” a pendant painting to the portrait in the museum’s permanent collection, “Mr. John Scollay,” reuniting the long-separated portraits of wife and husband, Shelburne Museum Director Thomas Denenberg announced. John Scollay, a chairman of the Boston Board of Selectmen and member of the Sons of Liberty, commissioned Copley (1738-1815), the preeminent portraiture artist in the American colonies, for this portrait of his wife as a pendant to his own portrait. Completed in...

AMEY RYAN
Why is there such low inventory? How long will this last? Prices are so high right now. Is it a good time to sell my home?   The low inventory is a combination of several factors. Some sellers are reluctant to list their homes for sale for fear that they won’t be able to find a suitable replacement home here, or in another location. Additionally, we’re seeing an uptick in interest from out-of-state buyers who are anxious to establish roots in Vermont in either a purchased or rented home. Lastly, some of the properties that have languished on the market have since sold. It’s standard economics...

NANCY FOSTER
Are you seeing more out-of-state or in-state buyers in Addison County these days?   I have seen more out-of-state buyers in the past year than I have ever seen in any other year, and I have been selling real estate over 40 years.  I think every out-of-state buyer wants to be sure the property has good access to a strong internet service, but so do most in-state buyers.   The other trend is that most buyers want an extra room that can be used as an office/computer room. That has been a trend over several years, but it is even more important to buyers now.  There are a good number of people...

'A CHORUS LINE'
Add a little razz-ma-tazz to your life and shake off any winter doldrums with “A History of the American Musical,” a four-class series taught by Town Hall Theater Artistic Director Doug Anderson. This might sound familiar, and it is. Anderson taught the same series in person — if you can believe it — back in the spring of 2019. Beginning on Monday, March 9, Anderson will launch the class via Zoom for an unlimited online audience. The course is a celebration of the legendary composers, lyricists and performers who forged a distinctly American art form, illustrated by archival footage from...

SUSAN JEFTS
Rorschach Test Shoulder blades of a house, one left, one right; both browned by afternoon suns. ~ ~ ~ Mouths of two bedroom windows, opened wide. ~ ~ ~ The outline of my grandparents, my grandma smelling like coffee and lavender soap, their shapes still pressed in their beds. ~ ~ ~ Something said and phrased by the throat of a wren, a morning filled with the language and shape of vowels. ~~~ The dead profiles of a Ford and Buick left to rust in the bramble, one turning left, the other turning right. ~ ~ ~ My father’s ‘59 Impala, its tires spinning, gambling on the slush of mud season; the...
(Viking Books for Young Readers) In David Arnold’s new young adult (that adults will also enjoy) post-apocalyptic survival story, a young woman and her dog set out on a quest, “roaming hillsides and ruined cities, foraging for supplies, operating on the fringes, trying to put their little piece of the world back together again.” Swarms of flies, infected with a deadly flu, have decimated the planet, leaving behind small bands of survivors who are trying — each in their own way — to live, to survive, to grow their own food, to build communities in the shadow of the destruction wrought by the...

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