Arts & Leisure

07/02/2020
Editor’s note: This is part of a series of stories and photos by Neshobe Elementary School students in reaction to their spring spent distance learning. Solon Jude Berry-Barrett — Age 9 Because of social distancing I had to do school time at home. The school didn’t want us to catch the coronavirus from each other then give it to our families and teachers. Normally I would get to school at 7:30 a.m. every day and visit with the sixth-grade class before going to my third-grade class. But at home my Google Meet school is only three days each week at 9 a.m. I don’t visit with anyone before it...
07/02/2020
Editor’s note: This is part of a series of stories and photos by Neshobe Elementary School students in reaction to their spring spent distance learning. Rylee Hall — Age 8 Since I have been staying home all the time I have a lot of free time and it was really boring. Before the coronavirus I was always busy participating in sports and other activities. Once everyone started staying at home, I went from having a busy schedule with a lot of things to do all the time to having nothing to do anymore. One day I started to use my free time to take online art classes. The classes are really fun and...
07/02/2020
Editor’s note: This is part of a series of stories and photos by Neshobe Elementary School students in reaction to their spring spent distance learning. Jordan Hemple — Grade 4 I have been in a quarantine so I have been doing school work from home. I have been spending more time with my puppy, Georgia. We have been doing a lot together. We have been playing after I finish up my schoolwork. While I have been doing my schoolwork Georgia has been sleeping. I have been spending a lot of time with her. We go on car rides. We play together. We go for walks together. We play in the yard. We have...
07/02/2020
Editor’s note: This is part of a series of stories and photos by Neshobe Elementary School students in reaction to their spring spent distance learning. Jacob Therrien — Age 7   My name is Jacob. I am 7 years old. During this time in my life I have been going to ponds, hiking at Otter Valley and Hawk Hill. I spend my time with my brother who is 4 and my parents. We walk our dog a lot and spend time outside. It has been a little sad not being at school, however it’s OK. I am spending lots of time with my family.
07/02/2020
Editor’s note: This is part of a series of stories and photos by Neshobe Elementary School students in reaction to their spring spent distance learning. Sienna Many   What has changed for me is without a desk at school we had to come up with a new workspace. We split the dining room table in half. Half for eating, and half for schoolwork. It’s changed my daily routine. I have four subjects versus 12 in a normal school day. But I do like staying home because we have a lot of fun as a family but I can’t wait to get back to school.
07/02/2020
Editor’s note: This is part of a series of stories and photos by Neshobe Elementary School students in reaction to their spring spent distance learning. Sigourney Brodowski — Age 7 This picture shows me and a mural on the wall of our porch. I designed it and I am painting the mural right now. I work on it once a day during a time that I would normally be at school with Ms. Leary. It’s important to me because when I look at the mural it kind of reminds me of school. In the mural there is a school (not painted yet), a bear, a school bus and a girl. Staying home has been nice because we have...
07/02/2020
Editor’s note: This is part of a series of stories and photos by Neshobe Elementary School students in reaction to their spring spent distance learning. Odin Waldie (Braeden’s little brother) I am 7 years old and I have gone to Leicester School for three years. Every Memorial Day our whole school walks down the road to the cemetery. We each carry a flag to wave on the way and most of us bring lilacs to leave on the graves there. We always sing songs and read poems or things we have written. The fourth-graders place a wreath to honor the veterans who have died. Then a bugle plays and we...
07/02/2020
Editor’s note: This is part of a series of stories and photos by Neshobe Elementary School students in reaction to their spring spent distance learning. Silas Waldie (Braeden’s other little brother) I just turned 6 and finished kindergarten at home because of the bad virus. Online classes were scary. Everybody’s pictures were on the screen looking at me. Mostly I stood across the room looking out the window and listened to my friends talking. After a few times I answered my teacher’s questions with the camera off, so no one could see me. At school I liked sitting on the rug. I could talk to...
07/02/2020
(Tor Teen) To amplify Black voices, it is important to read beyond the (still very important) contextual Black history and anti-racism books; it is important to read great stories that are written by Black authors with captivating Black characters, like this one. The secretly magical teens at the heart of this story engage with and comment on some of the same social issues we are grappling with today: racism, prejudice and oppression. In Tavia and Effie’s world, not all teens are treated equally. Sirens are forced to hide themselves, or wear silencing collars, to avoid persecution. Tavia, a...

JAPANESE BARBERRY, A popular landscaping plant, is a haven for ticks and should be replaced. Courtesy photo
07/02/2020
The Rutland Chapter of UVM Extension Master Gardeners has some concerns about a common ornamental plant that you may have on your property. The Japanese barberry is a spiny shrub that in the past 30 years became a popular landscape plant, chosen for its red autumn foliage and red berries in winter, and because it is deer resistant. The plant has virtually no predators or natural deterrents, and its thorns put off most animals that might graze on it. Why is Japanese barberry a problem?  Japanese barberry is originally from Asia, and consequently does not have natural enemies or competition in...

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Addison County Independent

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Middlebury, VT 05753

Phone: 802.388.4944
Fax: 802.388.3100