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PERENNIALS, SUCH AS heuchera, should be planted at least a month before the ground freezes to give plants time to become established and develop strong roots. Photo by Deborah J. Benoit
The leaves are turning to their autumn glory and it’s nearly time to put the garden to bed. But wait. There’s still time to add perennials to your garden, and I’m not talking about spring-blooming bulbs such as daffodils and tulips. You may be focused on trimming back faded leaves or deadheading flowers, but fall cleanup isn’t the only way to prepare for spring. While spring is the time of year we generally think of as planting time, fall also is a great time to add perennials to your garden. Why plant in the fall when the days are growing shorter and your to-do list is growing longer?...

DAN JAFFE WILDER
Noted landscape consultant Dan Jaffe Wilder will present a virtual four-hour workshop on Oct. 16 on building resilient home landscapes with native plants. The program, open to all interested gardeners and homeowners, will be offered via Zoom from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Although free to attend, donations will be accepted to support garden education programming offered by University of Vermont Extension Master Gardener chapters throughout Vermont. To register go to go.uvm.edu/resilient-landscape. To request a disability-related accommodation, contact Cindy Heath at (603) 543-1307 or cindy.heath@uvm.edu...

UNPEELED GARLIC CLOVES should be planted 3 inches deep with the pointed side up and root down. Photo by Joyce Amsden
I love growing garlic. Here in Vermont, it is best planted in fall because of its need for a dormant period of two months below 40 Fahrenheit degrees. Just as the reality of summer’s end sets in, planting the garlic is like planting the promise of spring. Seeing the little shoots emerge just behind the receding snow are well worth the small effort required. Plant your garlic in late September to mid-October. This allows it to put down some roots but not develop significant tops before the ground freezes. Avoid planting garlic from the grocery store. It may have been treated to prevent growth...

THE GROUP CALLING itself the Equine Heritage Herd, in partnership with the Bristol Recreation Department, will present the first annual Bristol Horse Day this Saturday, Oct. 2, at the newly reconstructed Bristol Horse Ring on Liberty Street. Pictured, from left, are Elissa Cobb, Claire Cyr, Chanin Hill, Lynda Malzac and Bristol Recreation Director Meridith McFarland. Independent photo/Christopher Ross
BRISTOL — On Sept. 30, 1958, during the Bristol Riding Club Horse Show and Gymkhana, a pony named “Thunder,” ridden by Norman Booska, suddenly collapsed in the ring. “Officials hastened to revive the stricken pony while spectators breathlessly awaited news of the gallant little steed’s condition,” wrote Mrs. Alice Ladeau, Sunday News Correspondent for the Burlington Free Press. Soon enough, however, “someone who knew the magic word whispered it in the pony’s ear and he arose, shook himself, and was led from the enclosure.” Thunder, it turned out, “had been taught to play ‘dead’ and had...
Vermont opened COVID-19 Pfizer booster registration to all eligible people Friday, including one newly announced category: Vermonters age 18 and older who are Black, Indigenous or people of color. Those eligible for the booster shots also includes all Vermonters age 65 and older, adults with high-risk conditions and adults at risk of exposure from their job (see list below). Booster shots are currently available only for people who got their second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine at least six months ago. There is no booster shot available for Moderna or Johnson & Johnson COVID...
MONTPELIER – Gov. Phil Scott announced that starting today, Friday, Oct. 1, many more Vermonters can now schedule and receive their Pfizer vaccine booster shots. “We know vaccines are safe and effective, and these additional doses add even more protection. So, I encourage anyone who is eligible to register for your booster today,” Scott said in a press release. “At the same time, we continue to urge those who have not yet gotten their first dose to get vaccinated. The data shows we are now in a pandemic of the unvaccinated, and vaccines are the best way to protect yourself, friends and family...
VERMONT — Vermont Everyone Eats (VEE), the unprecedented COVID-19 response program that provides meal assistance to Vermonters in need while supporting local restaurants, farmers and food producers, has received an extension to continue programming through the end of December. Program managers had previously anticipated that the program would end on Thursday, Sept. 30, but Vermont Agency of Commerce & Community Development this week extended the program contract through Dec. 31 to mitigate the ongoing economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic that continue to challenge the state’s hard-...
BRISTOL — The town of Bristol is in need of a few good number crunchers. For starters, the town is looking to replace Treasurer and Delinquent Tax Collector Jen Myers, who has served in those capacities since 2011. Myers resigned on Sept. 24, and her last day will be Friday, Oct. 8. “I truly appreciate the multitude of opportunities that have been provided to me in the past 10 years and wish the Town of Bristol the best in moving forward,” she wrote in her resignation letter. Bristol selectboard member Ian Albinson offered Myers a public thank-you at the board’s Sept. 27 meeting. “I’m sad to...

LARRY AND LYNN Schuyler visited St. Paul’s Episcopal church in Vergennes in the fall of 2019. Larry looked through church records and got to visit the town where his great-grandfather Stephen Bates had once been the chief police for 26 consecutive years.
VERGENNES — Vermont is awash in history. Some of it is as obvious as the white clapboard churches and the monumental stone markers erected in honor of Civil War veterans. Other history is overlooked  — for a while, at least  — though no less important. Much of what children and teenagers are given in the United States details history primarily centered around white supremacy and the patriarchy. This is true at national and local levels. Recently, a story was uncovered in Vergennes that exemplified that very fact. The key to understanding this issue is that it is local as much as it is...
MIDDLEBURY — The New Perennials Project is sponsoring a month of events throughout October that share, explore and deepen the work of the project, which is a multiyear exploration of the restorative powers of perennial thought and action in agriculture, education, the arts, wellness and sacred practice traditions. New Perennials Project considers how agriculture and education are dominant influencers of what we eat and how we think. All events are free and open to the public. Current CDC and Vermont COVID-19 restrictions apply. A month-long art exhibit, “The Earth Bestows,” opens Perennial...

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Addison County Independent