Op/Eds

At the risk of making fun of the world’s most serious crisis, pardon me for getting a chuckle out of a recent story in the Washington Post, which ran with the headline that July 2019 was the hottest month “humans have ever recorded.” Just how hot was it? Well, according to the story, “a local television station in the Netherlands aired nonstop images of wintry landscapes to help viewers momentarily forget the heat wave outside. Officials in Switzerland and elsewhere in Europe painted stretches of rail tracks white, hoping to keep them from buckling in the extreme heat. Wildfires raged across...
On any given Sunday evening volunteers at a local church in Burlington feed between 80 and 130 hungry people. The food is homemade, nutritious and delicious. The crowd is intergenerational. Some are homeless, some are food insecure and some appreciate the company and the safe space offered. With two tables laden with food and volunteers at the ready to serve, the first items on the line to be depleted are the vegetables and the second is the salad. Homemade apple sauce with no added sugar and whole fresh fruit is gone before the meal is over. “Time” magazine reported on Oct. 3, 2018, that “...
So many of my childhood memories are weather related. I grew up in Seattle, so you’re probably thinking “rain”, but that actually rarely figures in. I remember hot summer days when we would get to turn on the sprinkler, running through it, jumping over the spray, watching the water glisten on the grass and trickle down our skin. I remember the rare winter days when there would be enough snow to pull out our sleds and half scrape/half glide down the nearest hilly street. (These were sleds with runners; the plastic ones not yet on the market.) I loved the days when it was cold enough that ice...
People who don’t know how to make normal conversation like to pose annoying “thought experiments.” Their favorite: If a tree falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? We’ll never know, or care about, the answer. But it’s been on my mind lately, because I’ve been spending a lot of time around trees and forests. While I’m recovering from a shoulder injury, about all I can do without limits is walk. So I’ve been walking with a vengeance. A week ago Monday, while taking the dog on our customary morning loop through the woods on the Trail Around Middlebury, I came...
Editor’s note: This is the 29th in a series of essays on the history and meaning of the American political tradition. The Constitution of the United States provides for three branches of government, each exercising a separate power: legislative, executive, and judicial. Legislative power is the power to create laws; executive, the power to carry them out. Judicial power is the power of judgment. The term is derived from the Latin word “judex,” a judge, a public official who decides what is right, equitable, or good, in accordance with fundamental law. Article III of the Constitution provides...
                  Inside   Ducks of the early morning lake vee into nearby reeds, early summer rustling toward flight   while elsewhere morning scrim slowly rises, loosens peepholes along shorelines, pinpricks of light on familiar mountain stonecroppings   and bits of pale water, unmoved next to hints of flowing lights.   Lopey ghosts, those soft and racing sky spirits, skim above the steaming lake field. Puffs that plod into points of pines, pop.   On the lake’s far side, the jagged trees that jut in and out along peninsulas and coves   have not yet appeared but what is stored in...
There’s good news and bad news on Dog Team Road in New Haven these days. First the good news: the town did a wonderful job repaving the road. The road was in pretty bad shape but over the month of July it was scraped and repaved and it is lovely to drive on. Now the bad news: a resident of Dog Team Road on the Nop Farm has decided to display his racist views for all to see as they travel to and from home and work. The Confederate flag — the quintessential symbol of bigotry and Jim Crow and the KKK — flies right next to the road so as not to be missed. There is little doubt about what message...
Wonderful trails around Bristol. This network will get bigger and bigger. Get out now and do some hiking on nice easy trails. Drive to the east behind the new firehouse to a pile of gravel and walk left (east) along the edge of the woods to the corner of the woods and go right along this trail loop. Or park at the small buildings along the road to Mt. Abe and go left to the woods edge and look for ways into the woods to find the trail around the athletic fields just inside the woods. This trail has some signs showing tree types, but at this stage it would be good to have small, 3 x 3-inch in...
The following letter was written by Adam Lougee of the Addison County Regional Planning Commissions to Vermont Secretary of Transportation Joe Flynn. On June 12, 2019 the Addison County Regional Planning Commission passed a resolution expressing our support for construction of a new road to the north of the Vergennes downtown that would allow through-truck traffic to avoid the downtown without unduly burdening their transit (the Economic Corridor). A similar resolution was also passed by our Transportation Advisory Committee in May. The Route 22A corridor is an important link connecting the...
Addison Independent readers are seeing more asylum advocacy in your pages. Bringing a national debate to Vermont, protesters joined Bristol’s Fourth of July parade to denounce “concentration camps” on the U.S.-Mexican border. “Close the camps!” demanded almost 200 demonstrators in downtown Middlebury on July 12. On your editorial page, Angelo Lynn has decried the Trump administration’s needlessly harsh responses to 140,000 asylum-seekers who arrived in a single month. How could it be necessary to pen up thousands of Central American parents and children? Because the very question sounds...

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