Rose Evans


MARTI MCCALEB
MIDDLEBURY — Like many institutions of higher education around the country, Middlebury College is navigating a fine line in its compliance with changes in the federal rules concerning sexual assault allegations on campus, and its own rules that try to minimize harm done to assault survivors. At stake if the college fails to abide by the new rules: federal funding. “Failure to comply with the regulations could lead to the loss of all federal dollars, including federal financial aid for students,” said Marti McCaleb, Middlebury Civil Rights and Title IX Officer. “Middlebury’s approach to...
Editor’s note: This is the second in a series about women’s health in the pandemic. ADDISON COUNTY — Reports on the number of COVID-19 cases in an area and any success at flattening the curve are good ways to show the public health impacts of the coronavirus. But there are other indicators of the virus’s impact on public health that are less obvious but also critical. As physical distancing and isolation measures and practices work to mitigate the spread of the disease, they also serve to trap survivors of domestic and sexual violence at home with their abusers and hinder access to crucial...

EMILY ADAMS IS assistant attorney general in the Civil Rights Unit.
VERMONT — As three and a half years of Trump administration rollbacks of various rights and protections accumulated, one group of elected officials — state attorneys general — is receiving national attention for its role in holding the federal government accountable. The chief law enforcement officers in their states, state attorneys general also challenge the federal government and federal agencies for rules and regulations that the AGs believe violate the Constitution or pre-existing laws. In that role they serve as “the first and last line of defense” for many protections and civil...
This is the first in a series of stories about women's health in the pandemic. The ongoing coronavirus health crisis is changing the face of the nation’s health care system, from what types of care we prioritize to how we get that care and how quickly. Many are seeing that during the pandemic, some forms of care cannot wait.  One such necessity is reproductive health care, which ranges from contraception counseling to abortion services to family planning.  Nationally, an uptick in demand for birth control prescriptions, a rise in sexually transmitted infection (STI) rates and an increase in...

MUSIC STUDENTS MET and took lessons on Zoom at Leicester’s Camp Point CounterPoint this summer, and many hope to attend the camp on the shores of Lake Dunmore in person next summer.
LEICESTER — Anyone who’s used to spending time on Lake Dunmore during past summers may have noticed that the lake sounds a little quieter this year. The classical music typically emanating from the Camp Point CounterPoint (PCP) music school, a staple of the lake since 1963, is no longer being played — at least not in-person. But Jenny Beck, PCP co-owner and director since 2008, and her faculty and staff are still finding ways to deliver an online music camp experience that’s just as committed to being musically rigorous and socially gratifying.  The idea for an online music camp was floated...

3 FLIPPING THINGS organizers Gaen Murphree, left, Mike Roy and Lorraine Tobias don “VOTE” masks created by Carol Wood. They lead a local grassroots organization working to increase voter participation in key battleground states.
MIDDLEBURY— It’s less than four months until the general election, and most door-to-door campaign canvassing is still on hold because of the coronavirus pandemic.  But one Addison County voter engagement group is getting creative about getting citizens to the polls and pioneering a new kind of so-called “take-out activism” that they hope will empower potentially disenfranchised voters in key swing states. “3 Flipping Things” is an ad-hoc grassroots organization run by Middlebury residents Mike Roy, Gaen Murphree and Lorraine Tobias that aims to secure a Democratic victory in the presidential...
VERMONT — 2020 has been a historic year so far, to say the least. Yet, one historic milestone that comes only once a decade seems to be low on most Vermonters’ current lists of priorities: the federal census.  “With everything that the pandemic has disrupted, the Census is likely the last thing on people’s minds, yet it remains crucially important,” said State Rep. Peter Conlon, D-Cornwall. With a little more than five months left in the calendar year, Vermont participation rates in the 2020 Census continue to lag behind the rest of the country; it ranks 47th out of 50 in terms of self-...

EMPLOYEES FROM ATHLETIC Brewing Co. regularly improve outdoor recreation areas as part of their corporate mission. Recently the company, founded by a Middlebury College grad, committed to work on the Long Trail in Vermont.
A big donation to the Green Mountain Club by a company founded by 2005 Middlebury College graduate Bill Shufelt will help the club maintain the historic Long Trail. Athletic Brewing Company recently joined the list of Green Mountain Club corporate sponsors with a $15,000 donation and a commitment to support maintenance of the trail that stretches 272 miles from the Massachusetts border to the Quebec border. The Long Trail, established in 1910, is the country’s oldest long-distance hiking trail. The donation will also help shore up the Long Trail Patrol, the crew that maintains damaged and...

COMEDIAN AND PEIRCING artist Pierre Vachon playfully pours hand sanitizer on his head while showing off his tattoos for his upcoming COVID Calendar. The Middlebury entertainer is finding new creative outlets since public gatherings went away when COVID-19 showed up. Photo by Season Violet
MIDDLEBURY — Over the years, modern day Renaissance man Pierre Vachon has worn many different hats. The Burlington native has been known as a professional wrestler, a stand-up comedian, a piercing artist, an event producer at the Marquis Theater in Middlebury, and a DJ with Big Guys Entertainment, which he started with his friend Vinny Herbert. But, when most in-person entertainment was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Vachon found himself scrambling for a place to exercise his imagination … and to earn a paycheck. Well, the Middlebury resident is doing what he does best: getting...
WASHINGTON, D.C. — In the past six months since the novel coronavirus first reached the United States, about 115,000 Americans have died and roughly 36 million have lost jobs.  Meanwhile, Congress has struggled to keep up with the nationwide devastation despite passing four bills authorizing $3 trillion in aid for coronavirus relief, including more than $1 billion for Vermont.  As the nation faces recession and lawmakers debate over the scope and goals of the next relief package, here’s a breakdown of how the congressional response to the COVID-19 pandemic has affected Vermont and what work...

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