Vermont


LINDSAY KURRLE
This week’s writer is Lindsay Kurrle, secretary of the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development. It’s easy to look back over the last 18 months and see all of the ways that COVID has set us back: from shuttered businesses, to the thousands of Vermonters losing their jobs, a disproportionate amount of whom were women who had to exit the workforce to care for their children. As businesses and families struggled, government provided a safety net through Paycheck Protection Program loans, business grants, stimulus checks, and extended unemployment benefits. The intent of all those...

Farmer Brad Thomas of Orwell walks his field in 2015. Independent file photo/Trent Campbell
VERMONT — Next week a special social media event will showcase a day in the life of Vermont farmers. #Farm24VT runs from 5 a.m. on Wednesday, May 12, until 5 a.m. the following day. Farmers will share photos, videos and stories that provide a behind-the-scenes look at how local food gets to our tables. “With field trips and farm visits suspended because of COVID, #Farm24VT is designed to forge new relationships between farmers and consumers,” said Fran Stoddard in a promotional video that can be found on Facebook here. #Farm24VT content can be found by searching for the #Farm24VT hashtag on...
Last week, the U.S. Census Bureau released official population counts as of the April 1, 2020, census date, both for the United States as a whole (331,449,281, an increase of 7.4% since 2010), and for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The census population for Vermont — 643,077 — surprised many who have been following estimates of the state’s population for the last several years. The Census Bureau’s July 2019 estimate was that Vermont’s population had declined by 0.3% since 2010. This estimate was based on vital statistics such as birth and death records, information on...
The number of Vermont COVID cases each day has fallen 61% since April 1, the steepest drop in daily numbers in a year, officials said at a press conference Tuesday. The state reported 504 cases this week, down from 797 last week. Cases are dropping in every age group, even categories with a low vaccination rate, said Mike Pieciak, commissioner of the Department of Financial Regulation, for the state’s weekly statistical presentation. As of Tuesday morning, 324,100 Vermonters had been vaccinated against COVID-19, the state reported; of those, 100,000 had received their first dose of the...
MONTPELIER — It’s almost time for spring turkey hunting in Vermont. Youth and novice turkey hunting weekend is April 24 and 25 this year, and the regular spring turkey season is May 1-31. “The youth and novice turkey hunting weekend provides an excellent opportunity for experienced hunters to teach young or new hunters how to safely and successfully hunt wild turkeys,” said Chris Bernier, Vermont’s wild turkey biologist. To hunt turkeys on April 24 and 25, a youth must be 15 or younger and must have completed a hunter education course and possess a hunting license, a turkey hunting license...

WEYBRIDGE RESIDENTS FRAN and Spence Putnam have driven all-electric or hybrid-electric vehicles for years and enthusiastically recommend them to others because they pollute less, are quieter, and require less maintenance than their gas- and diesel-powered counterparts. Independent photo/Megan James
ADDISON COUNTY — If you took the $174 billion President Joe Biden has proposed spending on electric vehicles (EVs) over the next decade and split it evenly according to population, Vermont’s share would come to something like $330 million. Of course, that’s not how it works, and for now President Biden’s proposal is just that — a proposal. But it’s not hard to imagine the impact significant federal funding for EVs could have in Vermont, which already boasts more EV charging stations per capita than any other state, ranks seventh in the nation for electric vehicle policy and has gotten this...
Addison Independent Reporter Christopher Ross this week looked deep into the world of Electric Vehicles, or EVs. Learn more about the state of the industry, where it’s headed, and what it means to you. Click on the stories below to read all about EVs. • Has the electric vehicle era finally arrived? • What’s the deal with electric vehicles? • Car dealerships see bright future for EVs • EV growth depends on charging infrastructure • Taking the Electric Vehicle plunge: pros and cons • Fleets and public transportation going electric • Public EV charging stations in Addison County • Video: How to...

Courtesy of Drive Electric Vermont
VERMONT — Recent proposals by President Biden and Gov. Scott have included significant funding for electric vehicles and associated charging infrastructure, which they hope will hasten a transition away from gasoline-powered vehicles and their devastating effects on the climate. Funding efforts to reduce consumer costs and increase driving convenience will go a long way toward bringing this transition about, but many experts have said that one of the biggest challenges will be getting the word out to consumers about the benefits — to themselves and to the planet — of switching from gas to...

The number of public EV charging stations is growing. Here is one with a solar array in the Marble Works neighborhood of Middlebury. Independent photo/John S. McCright
BRISTOL — The town of Bristol has been trying to secure funding for a public electric vehicle (EV) charging station for a couple of years, but the cards just haven’t fallen into place, officials said. The COVID-19 pandemic hasn’t helped, of course. But thanks to the work of the Bristol Energy Committee, things might just be looking up. “I just had a good meeting this week with folks who are going to help us secure the funding,” committee chair Sally Burrell told the Independent earlier this month. “I think we’re on the right track now. We have the site chosen (West Street, along the park) and...

EMPLOYEES FROM NORTHEAST I.S. LLC stand with the fleet of four Chevy Bolt electric vehicles the New York company purchased from Alderman’s Chevrolet Buick GMC in Rutland in February. Alderman’s General Manager Mark Alderman committed to EVs early on, he said, and the dealer has now become one of the biggest sellers of Chevrolet EVs in the nation. Photo courtesy Alderman’s Chevrolet
RUTLAND / MIDDLEBURY — Mark Alderman believes we might be approaching a tipping point with electric vehicles (EVs). “EVs will become more and more common until they’re normal, and then it’ll be the ICE (internal combustion engine) cars that stick out,” said Alderman, who is general manager of Alderman’s Chevrolet Buick GMC, one of the biggest sellers of Chevrolet EVs in New England. EVs currently make up nearly 20% of new car sales at the Rutland dealership. But this didn’t happen by accident. “At the foundation of all this is that I think EVs are cool,” Alderman said. “The technology is far...

Pages

Login for Subscriber Access

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

Addison County Independent