Weybridge

WEYBRIDGE — Weybridge residents thought they’d dispensed with their 2020 tax bills last October. But the taxman cometh again, this time requesting retroactive payment of taxes that were understated last fall due to what local officials are calling “incorrect education tax rates incorporated in the 2020 tax bill.” “In August 2020, the Department of Taxes changed the procedure for publishing tax rates for individual towns,” reads a notice sent to Weybridge taxpayers recently. “The town made an error in translating the information. The result of the error is that the property tax rate for...
WEYBRIDGE — Every March, Duclos & Thompson Farm holds an open barn event for the community, and thousands show up to mingle with the new lambs. The event was cancelled this year because of the pandemic, but the lambs are as cute as ever.

NEARLY 100 ACRES of wetlands and streams have been protected by Monument Farms Dairy in Weybridge with help from state and federal investments.
WEYBRIDGE — Monument Farms Dairy in Weybridge recently protected 97 acres along the Lemon Fair River for water quality and wildlife habitat and conserved 160 acres of adjacent farmland. Three organizations — the Vermont Land Trust (VLT), Vermont Housing & Conservation Board (VHCB), and USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) — this month announced that the land along the river was enrolled in the NRCS ACEP Wetland Reserve Easement component. A family-owned dairy and milk processing business since 1930, Monument Farms is the only large-scale milk processor in Vermont that sells...

PHOTOGRAPHER JOHN HUDDLESTON recently published “At Home in the Northern Forest,” A book project that has taken him out into the woods of Snake Mountain behind his Weybridge home for the past decade. Independent photo / Steve James
Did you know that in the mid-1800s Vermont was nearly 80% deforested? “There were no bear, no beavers, no turkeys… they were just gone because we had cut down all the trees,” said John Huddleston, a Weybridge photographer of 50 years who recently published his latest photography book, “At Home in the Northern Forest.”  Why did we cut down all the trees? Good question. Huddleston’s book explains, “For the first half of the nineteenth century, the Northern Forest — stretching west from Maine to New Hampshire, Vermont and New York, extending north into Quebec and east to the Maritime Provinces...

RIPTON RESIDENT ANZA Armstrong was accompanied to the polls on Tuesday by her dog, Bailey. She and scores of other Ripton residents were asked if their town should withdraw from the Addison Central School District. The referendum passed, 163-107. Now residents in the six other ACSD communities will decide whether to affirm Ripton’s vote. Independent photo/Steve James
RIPTON — Ripton residents on Tuesday voted, 163-107, in favor of withdrawing from the Addison Central School District, while Weybridge residents opted against doing so by a 190-119 margin. The six other ACSD member towns must now vote in favor of Ripton’s bid to leave the district if the proposed exodus is to proceed to the Vermont Board of Education. The state board would then decide whether the town could become its own independent school district. Both the Ripton and Weybridge votes were triggered by citizens’ petitions seeking to prevent closure of their elementary schools. The ACSD board...

A YARD SIGN in Middlebury this week urges voters in Ripton to vote in favor of leaving the Addison Central School District. Independent photo/Megan James
This story was corrected after it was originally posted to correct an error. We found out after the story went to press that the ACSD had updated its FAQ on the Ripton and Weybridge secession votes, and that the two towns would not absolutely loose their small schools grants from the state if they left the school district. Instead, they could seek continuation of their Small School grants if ultimately the state granted them permission to continue as independent school districts. MIDDLEBURY — Ripton and Weybridge residents will go to the polls on Tuesday, Jan. 12, to decide whether they’d...
The Addison Independent received more letters regarding the upcoming ACSD secession votes than we had room to print in our Jan. 7 edition. Since the votes scheduled before our next print deadline,  here are all the letters on this subject — the ones we printed, plus the other that appear only here on our website. If we don’t trust ACSD leaders we should withdraw By Joanna Doria   Don’t overlook the intangibles that small schools provide By Saul Nurok   Keep Weybridge school open By Kelsey and Chris Eberly of Weybridge   Small schools face long odds By Jerry Shedd   Children are first priority...
Weybridge Elementary School was one of the primary reasons we chose Weybridge when we moved to the area in 2017. As our son has grown and is now set to begin kindergarten there this year, we've become even more excited for him to attend, as we've learned more about WES and its special place in the community. While we took part in the ACSD Facilities Master Plan discussions, and were hopeful they would lead to a positive outcome, unfortunately there seems to be no place for WES in the plans. We support the withdrawal from ACSD because we deeply value the student-centric, nurturing learning...
My take is the waters are muddy and closing three or four small schools is an extreme option. Moving forward with this plan puts Weybridge in the challenging position of accepting this option versus pursuing a similarly extreme option of withdrawal. Thus far a major focus has been on the tangible benefits of consolidation — finances and the physical state of individual buildings. While I appreciate each board member for their dedication and service to our community, I am concerned the board has overlooked many intangibles that can’t be easily quantified on a spreadsheet or neatly packed into...

JESSE WULFMAN, LEFT, and Brynn Kent are part of the creative team helping to promote the “FlossOFur” neck warmer, a product designed by fellow Emily Kiernan and the folks at Bee the Change. For every neck warmer they sell, Bee the Change will create 180 square feet of pollinator habitat. Photo courtesy of Bee the Change
WEYBRIDGE — This fall, after Vermont’s monarch butterflies began their dangerous migration to Mexico and Florida, leaving behind hundreds of acres of fields bursting with seed, Emily Kiernan and her family ventured forth seeking milkweed pods. Carefully harvesting one or two at a time, here and there, they amassed a total of about 4,000 pods, and brought them home. “Home” for the Kiernans also happens to be the headquarters for Bee the Change, which plants habitats for pollinators, like the monarch butterfly, in the unused spaces in solar fields. Setting up shop in their backyard they began...

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Addison County Independent