pandemic

While social distancing best practices may limit some of the ways you might typically cool down when it’s warm, there are still many ways you can keep your cool.  Older Vermonters and people with disabilities and chronic conditions are at greater risk for serious heat-related illnesses, and even death when the statewide average temperature reaches 87 degrees Fahrenheit or hotter. Keep reading for tips to stay cool during hot weather:  •  Drink up. Drink plenty of liquids, such as water or fruit or vegetable juices. Stay away from drinks containing alcohol or caffeine. Remember, start drinking...

IN HER SOCIAL worker role at Project Independence, Eileen Lawson has learned that live videoconference is one way to keep seniors physically active, which is vital for overall health.
MIDDLEBURY — Sometimes a chair is just a chair, but right now for many elderly clients at Project Independence a chair can be much more. In fact, after the senior center shut down in March due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a chair might be a home gym, a dance floor or a tour bus.  Project Independence, a branch of Elderly Services Inc., is an adult day center serving Addison County. It typically provides at Elderly Services’ Middlebury headquarters a wide variety of closely supervised, intellectually stimulating and physically beneficial activities to seniors with lessened mobility. Until March,...
Vermont Humanities and the Vermont Arts Council have distributed $517,500 in emergency relief grants to 81 different Vermont cultural organizations, including museums, libraries, performing arts venues, and other cultural centers. Many of these organizations are right here in Addison County or serve local residents. The grants support humanities and arts organizations that have been impacted by the COVID-19 outbreak and the resulting economic downturn. With events, festivals, camps and summer seasons canceled, cultural organizations across Vermont are struggling to survive. Arts and cultural...
The real estate market in northwest Vermont is recovering after the necessary shut down due to COVID-19, according to a report based on New England Real Estate Network numbers. The stay-at-home order went into effect on March 25 with restricted showings beginning again in late April. New listings in April declined 45% and pending contracts declined nearly 50%, according to a press release from Coldwell Banker Hickok & Boardman. As a result, a steep decline in closed sales followed in May. Real estate transactions typically take 45-60 days to close — therefore the restricted activity in...
Given the severity of the COVID-19 crisis at home, it can be easy to forget that a pandemic is an inherently global issue. As much pain as the pandemic has caused nationwide and in our local community, this is not the time to turn inward and ignore the impact this virus is having in lower-income countries worldwide, especially since the stability of the international community is in our interest as Vermonters. COVID-19 presents a significant health risk to people living in communities without access to healthcare and testing, especially in countries already fighting diseases like Tuberculosis...
Like all, we wish to congratulate the seniors at the area high schools — Middlebury, Mount Abraham, Vergennes, Otter Valley, Proctor and West Rutland. In the past four years they have delighted packed auditoriums with jazz, orchestral and theatrical performances; donated countless hours of community service; given their all athletically and sometimes won titles; learned the value of teamwork; excelled in academics and vocational training; participated in clubs; and forged lasting bonds of friendship. We salute the graduates and their friends and families and their accomplishments with this...
I spent the month of January travelling with my family in Asia. We visited Hong Kong, Macau, Vietnam, and Cambodia. Just before our return we heard about a new virus in China. Coronavirus was just shutting down the city of Wuhan as we flew back from Cambodia through the Guangzhou airport in China. As COVID-19 started to spread, I thought we dodged a bullet leaving Asia when we did. Our concern was for my sister who was returning to Shanghai, China, where she lives with her husband. They were then flying to Taiwan to spend Chinese New Year with his family. Soon after they reached Taiwan, it...
As I sit here, a grandmother and a great-grandmother, in the middle of this pandemic, a time we have never had to deal with before, I watch how it affects so many. There are so many questions, so many fears, so many rules to get used to, it’s frustrating and hard for all of us, especially the little children. A time of no playmates, no play dates, school at home, no times to go out and eat or go to a movie, and so many rules. As difficult as it is for us, imagine what it’s like to be an active seven-year-old, who goes back and forth between mom and dad in the midst of all this who is trying...
The murder of George Floyd by slow painful asphyxiation has broken the hearts of all caring people. Maybe he deserved to die you say. He broke the law, didn’t he? He and others were trying to pass counterfeit bills and were caught. He resisted arrest and was restrained by those officers who “protect and serve” the community.  If I lived in that community would I feel differently? If I ran the business that Floyd and friends were trying to scam, would I feel good about his death? When George Floyd begs for his life and says, “I can’t breathe,” I know I will never forget the lack of compassion...
Deb Rickner
For 27 years Bristol Elementary art teacher Deb Rickner has helped each of her sixth-grade students paint one cinderblock of the school's walls. This spring, because of the pandemic, she found a way for students to participate in the project from home. Independent photo/Christopher Ross.
BRISTOL — For nearly three decades, under the guidance of art teacher Deb Rickner, each graduating sixth-grader at Bristol Elementary School (BES) has created a personal design and painted it onto one cinderblock of the building’s interior. “The project must be about the kids, personally, like putting their stamp on the school,” Rickner told the Independent in a recent interview. Rickner’s students’ first canvas was the school cafeteria, where over the years successive classes of sixth-graders filled up every block that was safe to paint. In 2002 the project shifted to the hallways of the 5/6...

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Addison County Independent